Top 10 Foods Highest in Manganese

Written by Daisy Whitbread, MScN
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Top 10 Foods Highest in Manganese

Manganese is required by the body for bone development, calcium absorption, and blood sugar regulation. (1)

Manganese deficiency is rare but can be expressed in poor bone health, joint pain, fertility problems, and an increased risk of seizures. (1)

Overconsumption of manganese from food sources is also rare and can adversely affect the neurological system. (2)

Foods high in manganese include mussels, wheat germ, tofu, sweet potatoes, nuts, brown rice, lima beans, chickpeas, spinach, and pineapples. (3) The current daily value (%DV) for manganese is 2.3mg. (4)

Below is a list of high manganese foods sorted by a common serving size, for more, see the complete nutrient ranking of over 200 foods high in manganese .

List of High Manganese Foods

Mussels

#1: Mussels

Manganese
per 3oz
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
5.8mg
(251% DV)
6.8mg
(296% DV)
7.9mg
(344% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Cooked Blue Mussels

More Shellfish High in Manganese

-83% DV in 20 small clams
-45% DV in 3oz of oysters
-19% DV in 3oz of cooked crayfish

See all fish and seafood high in manganese.
Photo of wheat plants

#2: Toasted Wheat Germ

Manganese
per Oz
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
5.7mg
(246% DV)
20mg
(868% DV)
10.4mg
(454% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Toasted Wheat Germ
Sprinkle toasted wheat germ on top of cereal, salads, and toast.
A block of tofu

#3: Firm Tofu

Manganese
per Cup
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
3mg
(129% DV)
1.2mg
(51% DV)
1.6mg
(71% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Firm Tofu

More Soy Products High in Manganese

-94% DV in 1 cup of tempeh
-39% DV in 1 cup of green soybeans (edamame)
Sweet Potatoes

#4: Sweet Potatoes

Manganese
per Cup Mashed
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
2.5mg
(110% DV)
1mg
(43% DV)
2mg
(85% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Mashed Sweet Potatoes

More Vegetables High in Manganese

-42% DV in 1 cup of collards
-37% DV in 1 cup of peas
-34% DV in 1 cup of okra

See all vegetables high in manganese.
Pine Nuts

#5: Pine Nuts

Manganese
per Oz
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
2.5mg
(109% DV)
8.8mg
(383% DV)
2.6mg
(114% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Pine Nuts (Dried)

More Nuts and Seeds High in Manganese

-94% DV per oz of hemp seeds
-76% DV per oz of hazelnuts
-56% DV per oz of pecans

See all nuts and seeds high in manganese.
Brown Rice

#6: Brown Rice

Manganese
per Cup
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
2.1mg
(93% DV)
1.1mg
(48% DV)
2mg
(85% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Cooked Brown Rice

More Whole Grains High in Manganese

-67% DV in 1 cup of whole wheat pasta
-59% DV in 1 cup of oatmeal
-51% DV in 1 cup of quinoa

See all whole grains high in manganese.
Lima Beans

#7: Lima Beans

Manganese
per Cup Cooked
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
2.1mg
(93% DV)
1.3mg
(54% DV)
2mg
(89% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Cooked Lima Beans
Chickpeas

#8: Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans)

Manganese
per Cup
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
1.7mg
(73% DV)
1mg
(45% DV)
1.3mg
(55% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans) (Cooked)

More Beans High in Manganese

-49% DV in 1 cup of large white beans
-43% DV in 1 cup of navy beans
-43% DV in 1 cup of lentils

See all beans high in manganese.
A Bowl of Spinach

#9: Spinach

Manganese
per Cup Cooked
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
1.7mg
(73% DV)
0.9mg
(41% DV)
8.1mg
(353% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Cooked Spinach
Pineapples

#10: Pineapple

Manganese
per Cup
Manganese
per 100g
Manganese
per 200 Calories
1.5mg
(67% DV)
0.9mg
(40% DV)
3.7mg
(161% DV)
Source: Nutrition Facts for Pineapple

More Fruits High in Manganese

-40% DV in 1 cup of blackberries
-36% DV in 1 cup of raspberries
-29% DV in 1 cup of grapes
-28% DV in 1 cup of strawberries
-22% DV in 1 cup of blueberries

See all fruits high in manganese.

Printable One Page Sheet

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A printable list of foods high in manganese including mussels, wheat germ, tofu, sweet potatoes, nuts, brown rice, lima beans, chickpeas, spinach, and pineapples.

Health Benefits of Manganese

  • Antioxidant Protection - Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is the principal antioxidant used during energy production in the mitochondria (the powerhouse of our cells). (1)
  • Osteoporosis Protection (*Controversial) - Two recent studies have found that women with osteoporosis have lower blood manganese levels than women without osteoporosis. (5) This finding is a correlation and does not suggest any specific link between manganese and osteoporosis, however, it is promising since manganese is involved in bone development.
  • Prevention of Epileptic Seizures - Preliminary studies in rats show that those with lower manganese levels are more prone to epileptic seizures. (6) The causes of epilepsy, however, are not well understood, and more research needs to be done before there can be a conclusive link between epilepsy and manganese. (7)

Warnings

  • Mussels, Oysters, and Clams are high cholesterol foods which should be eaten in moderate amounts and avoided by people at risk of heart disease or stroke.
  • Intake of manganese from enriched infant formulas can lead to hyperactive children, or learning disabled children. Excessive levels of manganese are toxic and supplements should be approached with care. (8)

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Data Sources and References

  1. Role of manganese in neurodegenerative diseases
  2. Manganese in health and disease.
  3. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 28.
  4. NIH: Dietary Supplement Label Database
  5. Correlation between bone mineral density and serum trace elements in response to supervised aerobic training in older adults
  6. Manganese and epilepsy: brain glutamine synthetase and liver arginase activities in genetically epilepsy prone and chronically seizured rats.
  7. Manganese and epilepsy: a systematic review of the literature.
  8. Manganese in infant formulas and learning disability.