Top 10 High Iron Foods for Vegetarians and Vegans

Top 10 High Iron Foods for Vegetarians and Vegans

Iron is an essential nutrient primarily needed for transport of oxygen throughout the body. A deficiency of iron leads to weakness and anemia, commonly called iron-deficiency anemia. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia may take time to develop and include anxiety, irritability, hair loss, and depression. Iron deficiency anemia is difficult to diagnose and requires a blood test.

Iron is more bio-available in heme (meat) sources that from non-heme (plant sources), as such, vegans and vegetarians are often concerned about their iron status and intake. The Institute of Health practically doubles the recommended daily allowances of iron for vegetarians from 11mg to 20mg of iron per day for adults. The daily value (%DV) seen on most food labels also takes vegetarians into account and is set at 18mg per day. This amount of iron is a good goal for almost all individuals, except pregnant women, who should consume 27mg per day.

The good news is that the less iron you have the more your body will absorb, boosting the bioavailability of iron from all sources. Vitamin C found in plant foods also boosts iron absorption. The bad news is that nutrients like polyphenols in plant foods can block iron absorption. For information, see the section on iron absorption.

Vegetarian and vegan sources of iron include beans, lentils, tofu, dark leafy greens, dark chocolate, whole grains, mushrooms, seeds, nuts, pumpkin, squash, and salad greens. Eating a wide variety of these foods should ensure you get the 18mg daily value for iron. Below are the top 10 vegetarian and vegan iron food sources ranked by common serving size, for more, see the extended list of less common iron foods, and the article on fruits and vegetables high in iron.

Advertisement (Bad ad? How to mute ads)

High Iron Foods for Vegetarians and Vegans

Dried Apricots 1 Dried Fruit (Apricots)
  • 42% DV (8mg) iron per cup
  • 22% DV (4mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 35% DV (6mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Other fruit high in iron (%DV per cup): Peaches (36%), Prunes (26%), Figs (17%), Raisins (17%), and Apples (7%). Note: Dried fruit is high in sugar and calories.

Nutrition Facts for Low-Moisture Dried Apricots.
White Beans 2 Large White Beans
  • 37% DV (7mg) iron per cup
  • 30% DV (5mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 21% DV (4mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Other Beans High in Iron (%DV per cup cooked): Soybeans (49%), Lentils (37%), Kidney beans (29%), Garbanzo beans (Chickpeas) (26%), and Lima beans (25%), Navy (24%), Black Beans (Frijoles Negros) (20%), Pinto (20%), and Black-eyed Peas (20%).

Nutrition Facts for Cooked Large White Beans.
A Bowl of Spinach 3 Spinach
  • 36% DV (6mg) iron per cup cooked
  • 172% DV (31mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 20% DV (4mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Other Greens High in Iron (%DV per cup): Cooked Swiss Chard (22%), Cooked Turnip Greens (16%), Raw Kale (6%), and Raw Beet Greens (5%).

Nutrition Facts for Cooked Spinach.
Dark chocolate squares 4 Dark Chocolate
  • 28% DV (5mg) iron per 1oz square
  • 30% DV (5mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 97% DV (17mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
1 cup of cocoa powder provides 66% DV. A 1.5oz (44g) candy chocolate bar provides 6% DV.

Nutrition Facts for Unsweetened Baking Chocolate.
A bowl of quinoa 5 Quinoa
  • 15% DV (3mg) iron per cup
  • 14% DV (2mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 8% DV (1mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Other Grains High in Iron (%DV per cup cooked): Oatmeal (12%), Barley (12%), Rice (11%), Bulgur (10%), Buckwheat (7%), and Millet (6%). Bran from whole grains can harm absorption of iron supplements, while whole grains are a good source of iron, they should not be consumed with iron supplements.

Nutrition Facts for Quinoa Cooked.
Mushrooms 6 White Button Mushrooms
  • 15% DV (3mg) iron per cup cooked
  • 69% DV (12mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 10% DV (2mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Other Mushrooms High in Iron (%DV per cup sliced): Morels (45% DV), Oyster (6% DV), Shiitake (3% DV).

Nutrition Facts for Cooked White Button Mushrooms.
Squash and Pumpkin Seeds 7 Squash and Pumpkin Seeds
  • 14% DV (3mg) iron per 1oz handful
  • 18% DV (3mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 49% DV (9mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Other Nuts and Seeds High in Iron (%DV per ounce (28g)): Sesame (23%), Sunflower (11%), and Flax (9%), Cashews (9%), Pine nuts (9%), Hazelnuts (7%), Peanuts (7%), Almonds (7%), Pistachios (7%), and Macadamia (6%).

Nutrition Facts for Dried Pumpkin and Squash Seeds.
An acorn squash 8 Acorn Squash
  • 11% DV (2mg) iron per cup cooked
  • 18% DV (3mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 5% DV (1mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Pumpkin provides 7% DV per cup, most other winter squash provide 6% DV per cup.

Nutrition Facts for Baked Acorn Squash.
Stalks of leeks 9 Leeks
  • 10% DV (2mg) iron per cup
  • 38% DV (7mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 12% DV (2mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Scallions (Spring Onions) are also high in Iron with (2% DV) per onion.

Nutrition Facts for Leeks.
Cashews 10 Cashews (Dry Roasted)
  • 9% DV (2mg) iron per oz
  • 12% DV (2mg) per 200 calorie serving
  • 33% DV (6mg) per 100 grams (3.5 oz)
Other Nuts High in Iron (%DV per ounce (28g)): Pine nuts(9%), Hazelnuts (7%), Peanuts (7%), Almonds (7%), Pistachios (7%), and Macadamia (6%).

Nutrition Facts for Dry-Roasted Cashews.

See All 200 Vegetarian Foods High in Iron

Feedback || Subscribe
Advertisement (Bad ad? How to mute ads)

Pinnable infographic

Pin it button
Vegetarian and vegan sources of iron include beans, lentils, tofu, dark leafy greens, dark chocolate, whole grains, mushrooms, seeds, nuts, pumpkin, squash, and salad greens.
Advertisement (Bad ad? How to mute ads)

What affects iron absorption?

How much iron do you need?

The daily value (%DV) for iron is set at 18mg per day. Most adults only need 8-18mg, however, vegetarians and vegans should aim to consume 15-32mg per day.

Click each heading below for more information from MyFoodData.com

#1 Fortified Cereals 109% DV (20mg) in 3/4 cup
#2 Artichokes 28% DV (5mg) in 1 cup
#3 Hearts of Palm 25% DV (5mg) in 1 cup
#4 Soy Protein Isolate 23% DV (4mg) in 1oz
#5 Dried Thyme 19% DV (3mg) in 1 tblsp
#6 Jute (Molokhiya) 15% DV (3mg) in 1 cup
#7 Green Peas 14% DV (2mg) in 1 cup
#8 Pumpkin Leaves 13% DV (2mg) in 1 cup
#9 Tempeh 12% DV (2mg) in 100 grams
#10 Spirulina (Dried Seaweed) 11% DV (2mg) in 1 tblsp
#11 Dried Gogi Berries 11% DV (2mg) in 5 tbsp
#12 Tofu 10% DV (2mg) in 1/5 Block
#13 Whole Wheat Bread 6% DV (1mg) in 1 slice
#14 Molasses 5% DV (1mg) in 1 tbsp
#15 Sorghum Syrup 4% DV (1mg) in 1 tbsp

Click to View Comments

Data Sources and References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 28.
  2. Office of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet: Iron
  3. Hallberg L, Rossander L. Effect of different drinks on the absorption of non-heme iron from composite meals. Hum Nutr Appl Nutr. 1982 Apr;36(2):116-23.
  4. Richard F. Hurrell, Manju Reddy, and James D. Cook. Inhibition of non-haem iron absorption in man by polyphenolic-containing beverages. British Journal of Nutrition (1999), 81, 289-295
  5. National Library of Medicine Fact Sheet on Taking Iron Supplements.


Feedback || Subscribe