Top 10 Fruits Highest in Calcium

Top 10 Fruits Highest in Calcium

Calcium is a mineral necessary for the growth and maintenance of strong teeth and bones, nerve signaling, muscle contraction, and secretion of certain hormones and enzymes. (1)

A deficiency in calcium can lead to numbness in the fingers and toes, muscle cramps, convulsions, lethargy, loss of appetite, and abnormal heart rhythm. (1)

Finding calcium in fruits and vegetables is a concern for vegans, or those on a raw food diet.

Fruits high in calcium include calcium-fortified orange juice, prickly pears, tangerines, oranges, kiwifruit, mulberries, blackberries, guavas, papaya, and passion fruit. (2) The daily value (DV) for calcium is 1300mg. (1,3)

Below is a list of calcium rich fresh fruits, dried fruits are listed separately due to their high sugar content. Click here to see the section of dried fruits high in calcium. Also check the list of foods high in calcium, and vegetables high in calcium.

You can also view the list of over 100 fruits high in calcium using the nutrient ranking tool.

List of Fruits High in Calcium

A glass of orange juice1 Fortified Orange Juice
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
349mg
(27% DV)
140mg
(11% DV)
596mg
(46% DV)
Prickly Pears2 Prickly Pears
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
83mg
(6% DV)
56mg
(4% DV)
273mg
(21% DV)
Tangerines3 Tangerines
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
72mg
(6% DV)
37mg
(3% DV)
140mg
(11% DV)
Slices of orange4 Oranges
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
72mg
(6% DV)
40mg
(3% DV)
170mg
(13% DV)
Slices of kiwifruit5 Kiwifruit
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
61mg
(5% DV)
34mg
(3% DV)
111mg
(9% DV)
Mullberries6 Mulberries
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
55mg
(4% DV)
39mg
(3% DV)
181mg
(14% DV)
Blackberries on the stem7 Blackberries
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
42mg
(3% DV)
29mg
(2% DV)
135mg
(10% DV)
Half a guava8 Guavas
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
30mg
(2% DV)
18mg
(1% DV)
53mg
(4% DV)
Papayas9 Papaya
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
29mg
(2% DV)
20mg
(2% DV)
93mg
(7% DV)
Passion Fruit10 Passion-Fruit (Granadilla)
Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
28mg
(2% DV)
12mg
(1% DV)
25mg
(2% DV)

See All 149 Fruits High in Calcium

Printable One Page Sheet

Click to Print
Printable list of high calcium fruits.

Dried Fruits High in Calcium

FoodServingCalcium
1 Dried Figsper cup19% DV
(241mg)
2 Zante Currantsper cup10% DV
(127mg)
3 Golden Seedless Raisinsper cup7% DV
(93mg)
4 Dried Apricotsper cup6% DV
(72mg)
5 Goji Berries5 tbsp4% DV
(53mg)

Factors which Affect Calcium Absorption

  • Amount of Calcium Consumed - The more calcium you consume, the less you absorb. Though consuming more calcium will increase your total level. (1)
  • Age - Children absorb about 60% of the calcium from foods, while adults absorb only 20%. Calcium absorption decreases with age and people over 50 should eat more calcium. (1)
  • Pregnancy - Pregnant women absorb more calcium. (1)
  • Vitamin D Intake - Vitamin D enhances calcium absorption. It can be found in foods or created by exposing skin to sunshine. (1)
  • Phytic and Oxalic Acid - Even though some studies suggest phytic and oxalic acid affect calcium absorption, people eating a balanced diet will not be affected. Further, the percent daily value already accounts for this absorption factor. High amounts of oxalic acid are found in plant foods like spinach, collard greens, sweet potatoes, rhubarb, and beans. Phytic acid is found in whole bread and wheat bran. (1,4,5,6)
  • Sodium, Protein, Alcohol, Caffeine (Coffee and Tea) - A diet high in sodium, protein, alcohol, and caffeine (coffee and tea) can reduce the absorption and retention of calcium by causing more calcium to be excreted. Alcohol also interferes with the metabolism of vitamin D. (1)
  • Vinegar May Increase Absorption - A study on the absortpion of calcium in rats found that when the diet was composed of 1.6% vinegar the rats absored more calcium and also had stronger bones. (7)

About the Data

Data for the curated food lists comes from the USDA Food Data Central Repository.

You can check our data against the USDA by clicking the (Source) link at the bottom of each food listing.

Note: When checking data please be sure the serving sizes are the same. In the rare case you find any difference, please contact us and we will fix it right away.

About Nutrient Targets

Setting targets can provide a guide to healthy eating.

Some of the most popular targets include:
  • Daily Value (%DV) - The %DV is a general guideline for everyone and accounts for absorption factors. It is the most common target in the U.S. and is the target on the nutrition labels of most products. It is set by the U.S. FDA.
  • Reference Dietary Intake (%RDI) - The Reference Dietary Intake (RDI) is a customized target accounting for age and gender. It is set by the U.S. Institute of Medicine. The RDI for amino acids is set by the U.N. World Health Organization. The daily value (%DV) builds on the reference dietary intake to create a number for everyone.
  • Adequate Intake (%AI) - Sets a target for Omega 3 and Omega 6 fats. The Adequate Intake is also set by the U.S. Institute of Medicine. It represents a number to ensure adequacy but lacks the same level of evidence as the Reference Dietary Intake. In short, the number is less accurate than the RDI.
  • See the Guide to Recommended Daily Intakes for more information.

    Want to set your own targets? Sign up for an account and set custom targets in the daily meal planner.

View more food groups with the nutrient ranking tool, or see ratios with the nutrient ratio tool.

MyFoodData provides free nutrition data tools and articles to help you organize and understand the foods you eat.

Create a free account to get nutrition facts on recipes and meals, track foods, and set custom targets.

feedback

Data Sources and References

  1. Office Of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet: Calcium
  2. U.S. Agricultural Research Service Food Data Central
  3. NIH: Dietary Supplement Label Database
  4. In vitro bioavailability of calcium and iron from selected green leafy vegetables
  5. Effects of fiber, phytic acid, and oxalic acid in the diet on mineral bioavailability.
  6. Calcium Absorption from Kale
  7. Enhancing effect of dietary vinegar on the intestinal absorption of calcium in ovariectomized rats