Top 10 Foods and Drinks High in Caffeine

Top 10 Foods and Drinks High in Caffeine

Caffeine is a chemical naturally found in several plant foods and drinks. Synthetic supplemental forms of caffeine are also produced and added to foods. Due to caffeine's stimulating and addictive qualities, it is finding its way into more and more unhealthy foods including sodas, candies, and energy drinks.

The health benefits and costs of caffeine are controversial with numerous studies to document both benefits and health problems due to caffeine. The upper intake limit (UL) of caffeine intake is 400mg for adults and less than 85mg for kids.

High caffeine foods and drinks include chocolate-covered coffee beans, coffee, energy drinks, espresso, sodas, green tea, black tea, dark chocolate, coffee liqueur, and baked goods containing chocolate.

For all these foods and drinks the amount of caffeine is an average. The actual amount of caffeine can vary based on how strongly tea or coffee is brewed, and as to how much caffeine is added to various colas and energy drinks.

List of High Caffeine Foods and Drinks

Chocolate coffee beans1 Dark Chocolate Coated Coffee Beans
Caffeine
per oz(28 Beans)
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
336mg
(84% UL)
839mg
(210% UL)
311mg
(78% UL)
Cafe Americano2 Coffee
Caffeine
per 8oz Cup
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
95mg
(24% UL)
40mg
(10% UL)
8000mg
(2000% UL)
An energy drink3 Energy Drinks
Caffeine
per 8oz Cup
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
91mg
(23% UL)
38mg
(10% UL)
123mg
(31% UL)

Energy drinks are typically high in sugar, sweeteners, and other artificial additives and should be avoided.

A cup of espresso4 Espresso
Caffeine
per 1oz Shot
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
63mg
(16% UL)
212mg
(53% UL)
4711mg
(1178% UL)
A can of soda5 Sodas
Caffeine
per 16oz Bottle
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
49mg
(12% UL)
10mg
(3% UL)
49mg
(12% UL)

Energy drinks are typically high in sugar, sweeteners, and other artificial additives and should be avoided.

A cup of green tea6 Green Tea
Caffeine
per 8oz Cup
Caffeine
per 100g
28mg
(7% UL)
12mg
(3% UL)
Black Tea7 Black Tea
Caffeine
per 8oz Cup
Caffeine
per 100g
26mg
(7% UL)
11mg
(3% UL)
Dark Chocolate8 Dark Chocolate
Caffeine
per 1oz Square
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
24mg
(6% UL)
86mg
(22% UL)
30mg
(7% UL)
  • Cocoa powder provides 198mg of caffeine per cup
  • Hot cocoa provides 5mg per cup
Bottles of Liqueur9 Coffee Liqueur
Caffeine
per 1.5oz Shot
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
14mg
(3% UL)
26mg
(7% UL)
15mg
(4% UL)
A slice of chocolate cake10 Chocolate Cake with Frosting
Caffeine
per Slice
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
8mg
(2% UL)
6mg
(2% UL)
3mg
(1% UL)

Other baked goods containing caffeine include chocolate cake, chocolate-coated cookies, and anything with chocolate frosting.

Printable One Page Sheet

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Printable one page sheet of the top 10 foods and drinks highest in caffeine.

About the Data

Data for the curated food lists comes from the USDA Food Data Central Repository.

You can check our data against the USDA by clicking the (Source) link at the bottom of each food listing.

Note: When checking data please be sure the serving sizes are the same. In the rare case you find any difference, please contact us and we will fix it right away.

About Nutrient Targets

Setting targets can provide a guide to healthy eating.

Some of the most popular targets include:
  • Daily Value (%DV) - The %DV is a general guideline for everyone and accounts for absorption factors. It is the most common target in the U.S. and is the target on the nutrition labels of most products. It is set by the U.S. FDA.
  • Reference Dietary Intake (%RDI) - The Reference Dietary Intake (RDI) is a customized target accounting for age and gender. It is set by the U.S. Institute of Medicine. The RDI for amino acids is set by the U.N. World Health Organization. The daily value (%DV) builds on the reference dietary intake to create a number for everyone.
  • Adequate Intake (%AI) - Sets a target for Omega 3 and Omega 6 fats. The Adequate Intake is also set by the U.S. Institute of Medicine. It represents a number to ensure adequacy but lacks the same level of evidence as the Reference Dietary Intake. In short, the number is less accurate than the RDI.
  • See the Guide to Recommended Daily Intakes for more information.

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Data Sources and References

  1. U.S. Agricultural Research Service Food Data Central