19 Beans and Legumes High in Fiber

Written by Daisy Whitbread, MScN
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19 Beans and Legumes High in Fiber

Beans are a great source of fiber, with the average cup of beans providing over 50% of the daily value (%DV).

Beans high in fiber include navy beans, small white beans, adzuki beans, split peas, lentils, pintos, mung, chickpeas, and kidney beans. The current daily value (%DV) for fiber is 25 grams. (1)

Below is a list of 19 beans high in fiber, for more, see the nutrient ranking of over 50 beans high in fiber.


List of Beans High in Fiber

Navy Beans

#1: Navy Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
19g
(76% DV)
11g
(42% DV)
15g
(60% DV)
Small White Beans

#2: Small White Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
19g
(74% DV)
10g
(42% DV)
15g
(59% DV)
Adzuki Beans

#3: Adzuki Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
17g
(67% DV)
7g
(29% DV)
11g
(46% DV)
Split Peas

#4: Split Peas

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
16g
(65% DV)
8g
(33% DV)
14g
(56% DV)
Lentils

#5: Lentils

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
16g
(63% DV)
8g
(32% DV)
14g
(54% DV)
Pinto Beans

#6: Pinto Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
15g
(62% DV)
9g
(36% DV)
13g
(50% DV)
Mung Beans

#7: Mung Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
15g
(61% DV)
8g
(30% DV)
14g
(58% DV)
Cranberry Beans

#8: Cranberry (Roman) Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
15g
(61% DV)
9g
(34% DV)
13g
(51% DV)
Black Beans

#9: Black Beans (Frijoles Negros)

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
15g
(60% DV)
9g
(35% DV)
13g
(53% DV)
Chickpeas

#10: Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans)

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
12g
(50% DV)
8g
(30% DV)
9g
(37% DV)
Great Northern Beans

#11: Great Northern Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
12g
(50% DV)
7g
(28% DV)
12g
(47% DV)
Kidney Beans

#12: Kidney Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
11g
(45% DV)
6g
(26% DV)
10g
(40% DV)
White Beans

#13: Large White Beans

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
11g
(45% DV)
6g
(25% DV)
9g
(36% DV)
Black Eyed Peas

#14: Black-Eyed Peas (Cowpeas)

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
11g
(44% DV)
7g
(26% DV)
11g
(45% DV)
Soy Beans

#15: Boiled Soybeans (Edamame)

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
10g
(41% DV)
6g
(24% DV)
7g
(28% DV)
Natto

#16: Natto

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
9g
(38% DV)
5g
(22% DV)
5g
(20% DV)
Broad Beans

#17: Broad Beans (Fava)

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
9g
(37% DV)
5g
(22% DV)
10g
(39% DV)
A block of tofu

#18: Tofu

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
6g
(23% DV)
2g
(9% DV)
3g
(13% DV)
Soymilk

#19: Unsweetened Soymilk

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
2g
(8% DV)
0g
(2% DV)
2g
(10% DV)

See All 69 Beans and Lentils High in Fiber

How much fiber do you need each day?

The percent daily value (%DV) for fiber is 25 grams per day (2) and the adequate intake (AI) for adults is 38 grams per day. (3)

The Percent Daily Value (%DV) is shown on food labels to help the "average" consumer compare foods, while the adequate intake (AI) is meant to give people a more accurate daily target by age and gender. In this case, the daily value for fiber is likely set too low and should be revised higher by the FDA.

Here is the breakout of the adequate intake by age and gender for fiber: (3)

  • 1-3 years old: 19g/day
  • 4-8 years old: 25g/day
  • Boys 9-13 years old: 31g/day
  • Boys 14-18 years old: 38g/day
  • Girls 9-18 years old: 26g/day
  • Men 19-50 years old: 38g/day
  • Men 50+ years old: 30g/day
  • Women 19-50 years old: 25g/day
  • Women 50+ years old: 21g/day
  • Pregnant and Lactating Women: 28-29g/day

Differences in fiber requirements between men and women are established based on estimated energy needs, and data which suggests the amount of fiber for protective health affects against cardiovascular disease. In other words, men should consume more fiber to gain the health benefits.(3)

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Data Sources and References

  1. U.S. FDA on Dietary Fiber (PDF)
  2. Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intakes
  3. U.S. Agricultural Research Service Food Data Central

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