33 Vegetables High in Fiber

33 Vegetables High in Fiber

Vegetables are arguably the healthiest of all the food groups and are a great source of fiber.

Vegetables high in fiber include lima beans, acorn squash, green peas, collard greens, artichokes, parsnips, broccoli, carrots, spinach, and more. The current daily value (DV) for fiber is 28 grams. (2)

Below is a list of 33 vegetables high in fiber, for more, see the article on high fiber foods and also the list of 200 fiber rich vegetables.

List of Vegetables High in Fiber

Lima Beans1 Lima (Butter) Beans
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
9g
(33% DV)
5g
(19% DV)
9g
(31% DV)
An acorn squash2 Acorn Squash
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
9g
(32% DV)
4g
(16% DV)
16g
(56% DV)
Green Peas3 Green Peas
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
9g
(31% DV)
6g
(20% DV)
13g
(47% DV)
Collard Green Leaves4 Collard Greens
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
8g
(27% DV)
4g
(14% DV)
24g
(87% DV)
Artichokes5 Artichokes (Globe or French)
Fiber
in a Medium Artichoke
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
7g
(25% DV)
5g
(19% DV)
23g
(82% DV)
Half a Butternut Squash6 Butternut Squash
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
7g
(23% DV)
3g
(11% DV)
16g
(57% DV)
A parsnip7 Parsnips
Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
7g
(23% DV)
5g
(18% DV)
13g
(47% DV)
Kale leaves8 Kale
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
5g
(19% DV)
4g
(14% DV)
22g
(79% DV)
Broccoli Stalk9 Broccoli
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
5g
(18% DV)
3g
(12% DV)
19g
(67% DV)
Carrots10 Carrots
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
5g
(17% DV)
3g
(11% DV)
17g
(61% DV)
A Bowl of Spinach11 Spinach
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(15% DV)
2g
(9% DV)
21g
(75% DV)
Beet Greens12 Beet Greens
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(15% DV)
3g
(10% DV)
21g
(77% DV)
Brussels Sprouts13 Brussels Sprouts
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(14% DV)
3g
(9% DV)
14g
(52% DV)
Green Beans14 Green (Snap) Beans
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(14% DV)
3g
(11% DV)
18g
(65% DV)
Sliced Okra15 Okra
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(14% DV)
3g
(9% DV)
23g
(81% DV)
Sliced Sweet Potato16 Sweet Potatoes
Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(14% DV)
3g
(11% DV)
7g
(25% DV)
Swiss Chard17 Swiss Chard
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(13% DV)
2g
(8% DV)
21g
(75% DV)
Potatoes18 Baked Potatoes
Fiber
in a Medium Potato
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(13% DV)
2g
(8% DV)
5g
(16% DV)
Asparagus19 Asparagus
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(13% DV)
2g
(7% DV)
18g
(65% DV)
Mushrooms20 White Button Mushrooms
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
3g
(12% DV)
2g
(8% DV)
16g
(56% DV)
Turnips21 Turnips
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
3g
(11% DV)
2g
(7% DV)
18g
(65% DV)
Rutabagas22 Rutabagas (Swedes, Neeps)
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
3g
(11% DV)
2g
(6% DV)
12g
(43% DV)
Yellow Sweet Corn23 Sweet Corn
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
3g
(10% DV)
2g
(7% DV)
5g
(17% DV)
Fennel Stalks24 Fennel
Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
3g
(10% DV)
3g
(11% DV)
20g
(71% DV)
Eggplants25 Eggplant (Aubergine)
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
2g
(9% DV)
3g
(9% DV)
14g
(51% DV)
Cabbage26 Cabbage
Fiber
per Cup Raw
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
2g
(8% DV)
3g
(9% DV)
20g
(71% DV)
A head of cauliflower27 Cauliflower
Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
2g
(8% DV)
2g
(7% DV)
16g
(57% DV)
Zucchini28 Zucchini (Courgette)
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
2g
(6% DV)
1g
(4% DV)
13g
(48% DV)
Tomatoes29 Tomatoes
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
2g
(6% DV)
1g
(4% DV)
13g
(48% DV)
Green Bell Peppers30 Green Bell Peppers
Fiber
per Cup Cooked
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
2g
(6% DV)
1g
(4% DV)
9g
(31% DV)
Stalks of leeks31 Leeks
Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
2g
(6% DV)
2g
(6% DV)
6g
(21% DV)
Stalks of Celery32 Celery
Fiber
per Cup Raw
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
1g
(4% DV)
2g
(6% DV)
23g
(82% DV)
Lettuce33 Lettuce
Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
1g
(4% DV)
2g
(8% DV)
25g
(88% DV)

See All 200 Vegetables High in Fiber

How much fiber do you need each day?

The percent daily value (%DV) for fiber is 28 grams per day (2) and the adequate intake (AI) for adults is 38 grams per day. (3)

The Percent Daily Value (%DV) is shown on food labels to help the "average" consumer compare foods, while the adequate intake (AI) is meant to give people a more accurate daily target by age and gender. In this case, the daily value for fiber is probably set too low and should be revised higher by the FDA.

Here is the breakout of the adequate intake by age and gender for fiber: (3)

  • 1-3 years old: 19g/day
  • 4-8 years old: 25g/day
  • Boys 9-13 years old: 31g/day
  • Boys 14-18 years old: 38g/day
  • Girls 9-18 years old: 26g/day
  • Men 19-50 years old: 38g/day
  • Men 50+ years old: 30g/day
  • Women 19-50 years old: 25g/day
  • Women 50+ years old: 21g/day
  • Pregnant and Lactating Women: 28-29g/day

Differences in fiber requirements between men and women are established based on estimated energy needs, and data which suggests the amount of fiber required for protection against cardiovascular disease. In other words, men need to consume more fiber to gain the health benefits.(3)

About the Data

Data for the curated food lists comes from the USDA Food Data Central Repository.

You can check our data against the USDA by clicking the (Source) link at the bottom of each food listing.

Note: When checking data please be sure the serving sizes are the same. In the rare case you find any difference, please contact us and we will fix it right away.

About Nutrient Targets

Setting targets can provide a guide to healthy eating.

Some of the most popular targets include:
  • Daily Value (%DV) - The %DV is a general guideline for everyone and accounts for absorption factors. It is the most common target in the U.S. and is the target on the nutrition labels of most products. It is set by the U.S. FDA.
  • Reference Dietary Intake (%RDI) - The Reference Dietary Intake (RDI) is a customized target accounting for age and gender. It is set by the U.S. Institute of Medicine. The RDI for amino acids is set by the U.N. World Health Organization. The daily value (%DV) builds on the reference dietary intake to create a number for everyone.
  • Adequate Intake (%AI) - Sets a target for Omega 3 and Omega 6 fats. The Adequate Intake is also set by the U.S. Institute of Medicine. It represents a number to ensure adequacy but lacks the same level of evidence as the Reference Dietary Intake. In short, the number is less accurate than the RDI.
  • See the Guide to Recommended Daily Intakes for more information.

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View more food groups with the nutrient ranking tool, or see ratios with the nutrient ratio tool.

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Data Sources and References

  1. U.S. Agricultural Research Service Food Data Central
  2. FDA on Daily Values
  3. Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intakes